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General Genealogy News and Information

Ancestral Chart

genchart        famrecord

Click the either chart to display/print an ancestral chart or Family Group Record. (pdf format)

 

Relationship Chart

Genealogy Relationship Chart
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1 Common Ancestor Son or Daughter Grandson or Daughter Great Grandson or Daughter 2nd Great Grandson or Daughter 3rd Great Grandson or Daughter 4th Great Grandson or Daughter 5th Great Grandson or Daughter 6th Great Grandson or Daughter 7th Great Grandson or Daughter
2 Son or Daughter Brother or Sister

Niece or
Nephew

Grand Niece
or Nephew  

Great Grand  Niece or Nephew

2nd Great Grand Niece or Nephew

3rd Great Grand Niece or Nephew

4th Great Grand Niece or Nephew

5th Great Grand Niece or Nephew

6th Great Grand Niece or Nephew

3 Grandson or Daughter

Niece or Nephew

First Cousin First Cousin Once Removed First Cousin Twice Removed First Cousin Three Times Removed First Cousin Four Times Removed First Cousin Five Times Removed First Cousin Six Times Removed First Cousin Seven Times Removed
4 Great Grandson or Daughter

Grand Niece or Nephew

First Cousin Once Removed Second Cousin Second Cousin Once Removed Second Cousin Twice Removed Second Cousin Three Times Removed Second Cousin Four Times Removed Second Cousin Five Times Removed Second Cousin Six Times Removed
5 2nd Great Grandson or Daughter

Great Grand Niece or Nephew

First Cousin Twice Removed Second Cousin Once Removed Third Cousin Third Cousin Once Removed Third Cousin Twice Removed Third Cousin Three Times Removed Third Cousin Four Times Removed Second Cousin Five Times Removed
6 3rd Great Grandson or Daughter

2nd Great Grand Niece or Nephew

First Cousin Three Times Removed Second Cousin Twice Removed Third Cousin Once Removed Fourth Cousin Fourth Cousin Once Removed Fourth Cousin Twice Removed Fourth Cousin Three Times Removed Fourth Cousin Four Times Removed
7 4th Great Grandson or Daughter

3rd Great Grand Niece or Nephew

First Cousin Four Times Removed Second Cousin Three Times Removed Third Cousin Twice Removed Fourth Cousin Once Removed Fifth Cousin Fifth Cousin Once Removed Fifth Cousin Twice Removed Fifth Cousin Three Times Removed
8 5th Great Grandson or Daughter

4th Great Grand Niece or Nephew

First Cousin Five Times Removed Second Cousin Four Times Removed Third Cousin Three Times Removed Fourth Cousin Twice Removed Fifth Cousin Once Removed Sixth Cousin Sixth Cousin Once Removed Sixth Cousin Twice Removed
9 6th Great Grandson or Daughter

5th Great Grand Niece or Nephew

First Cousin Six Times Removed Second Cousin Five Times Removed Third Cousin Four Times Removed Fourth Cousin Three Times Removed Fifth Cousin Twice Removed Sixth Cousin Once Removed Seventh Cousin Seventh Cousin Once Removed
10 7th Great Grandson or Daughter

6th Great Grand Niece or Nephew

First Cousin Seven Times Removed Second Cousin Six Times Removed Third Cousin Five Times Removed Fourth Cousin Four Times Removed Fifth Cousin Three Times Removed Sixth Cousin Twice Removed Seventh Cousin Once Removed Eighth Cousin

Instructions:

  1. Select two people in your family and figure out which ancestor they have in common. For example, if you chose yourself and a first cousin, you would have a grandparent in common.

  2. Look at the top row of the chart (in blue) and find the first person's relationship to the common ancestor.

  3. Look at the far left column of the chart (in blue) and find the second person's relationship to the common ancestor.

  4. Move across the columns and down the rows to determine where the row and column containing these two relationships (from #2 & #3) meet. This box is the relationship between the two individuals.

 

Genealogy Tips

maingraphic

Where to Look for Family Records

Family Sources: Don’t underestimate the value of bits and pieces of family lore, dates, names, and places. And don’t trust these gems to your memory. Record the information on standard 8 1/2 x 11 paper instead of assorted scraps. Add the date, the name and address of the person interviewed, and the circumstances or occasion that sparked the information. In addition, let me encourage you to make some journal entries about your own life. Wouldn’t it be a shame if your future descendants knew quite a lot about most of their ancestors, but nothing about YOU? Don’t wait to do a lengthy manuscript. Instead, write vignettes, just a paragraph or a page on a specific subject at the time the event or memory makes a vivid picture in your own mind. Be sure to organize your material so that others can find it, understand it, and appreciate it. You are contributing to the HERITAGE of others! Enjoy the search for your own heritage, and leave a trail for others to follow!

Where to Research: Perhaps your ancestors number among the rich and famous. However, ours were mostly poor and ordinary and that makes the search more difficult. We have relied heavily on family legends, photographs, Bibles, and letters for clues. From there we turned to county histories, census records, land plat maps, deed and probate records, vital records, church records, cemetery lists, and information about migration patterns. Visit your local libraries, historical societies, and courthouses. Seek advice over the Internet about specific geographical areas and surnames; there are many people out there doing family history, and you’ll enjoy exchanging information. Remember to ask for SOURCES so that you can follow up, confirm, and add to your storehouse of data.

Read more: Genealogy Tips
 

Genealogical Maturity Model

Friday, October 22, 2010

Genealogical Maturity Model

 
The Genealogical Maturity Model is a framework for personal growth
The Genealogical Maturity Model is a
framework for personal growth.
© 1971. All rights reserved.

This is a “table of contents” article to a previously published series of articles.

Want to be a better genealogist? The central skill needed by every genealogist is the ability to produce verifiably correct genealogists. I call that “Genealogical Maturity.” I developed the Genealogical Maturity Model as an easy way to grade your own maturity and to create small, attainable goals for improvement.

Let me be clear. I am no expert in this regard. I have based the model as nearly as I can on broadly acknowledged best practices published in BCG Genealogical Standards Manual, Helen F. M. Leary, editor; Evidence Explained, Elizabeth Shown Mills; and Genealogical Proof Standard, Christine Rose. Anything in the model that is correct you can attribute to these experts. Anything incorrect is... well... me.

Read more: Genealogical Maturity Model
 

FamilySearch Surpasses Ancestry.com?

Wednesday, October 5, 2011

FamilySearch Surpasses Ancestry.com?

 

imageDavid Ouimette of FamilySearch said that their collection of the highest quality genealogy records has surpassed Ancestry.com’s. He made the remarks at the recent Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) annual conference. He said FamilySearch has more Images of civil vital records, church records of vital events, and census records. 

300 million

According to Ouimette, every month FamilySearch digitizes tens of millions of the 3.6 billion images in the vault. “We’re going as fast as we can, publishing indexes to high quality records first,” he said. “We have about 200 cameras that are currently active throughout the world,” said Ouimette. They digitize millions of images in archives weekly.

“As of last night,” he said, “FamilySearch has almost 300 million images.”

He showed a table of the number of images and records for each record type. I scribbled down the numbers as fast as I could, so you should probably regard them with suspicion. For one thing, the number of images doesn’t total to 300, so buyer beware. For another, I had to move the decimal point just to get them to add up half-way right.

Read more: FamilySearch Surpasses Ancestry.com?
 

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